ANIMAL INTAKE POLICY & PROTOCOLS

PET ADMISSIONS:

The Enid SPCA receives numerous requests each week to take in dogs and cats.  Unfortunately, we cannot safely or humanely accommodate more than our shelter can hold.  The Enid SPCA is a no-kill shelter; we do not euthanize current residents in order to make room for new animals.  Cages open up when our animals are adopted, enter foster care or transported to other facilities, never through mass euthanizing.

The Enid SPCA accepts animals including, but not limited to, stray animals, owned animals and animals pulled from other shelters. Upon admission, each animal will receives a full physical evaluation by our staff. In addition, behavior assessments are performed on select animals, including those with a concerning behavior history or those that have shown concerning behavior at the shelter. Following these evaluations, our staff identifies appropriate program(s) to meet the animal’s needs.

The Enid SPCA encourages patrons to take lost animals to Enid Animal Control, but we will accept them from a good Samaritan if space allows by appointment only.

The Enid SPCA makes every effort to reunite lost animals with their original owners through matching found animals with lost reports that have been filed and researching animals identified by tags or microchips. Owners who are reclaiming their animals are offered a microchip identification implant.

The Enid SPCA holds stray animals for the legally required period of time. If an owner does not reclaim an animal, it is evaluated to determine whether it should be made available for adoption immediately or requires further behavioral or medical evaluation.

MANAGED ADMISSIONS PROGRAM: 

Deciding to give up your family pet is never easy, but sadly, can be necessary due to unexpected life changes or emergency situations.  We know these decisions are hard and we want to help you.  The Enid SPCA accepts owner-surrendered dogs and cats by appointment only.   To schedule an appointment, owners may visit the shelter at 1116 Overland Trail or call 580-233-1325.

Our shelter is typically at capacity for both dogs and cats.  As a result, we may not be able to admit your animal at the exact time you need.  Enid Animal Control (580-249-4910) is an option in that situation.  As a non-profit organization, our ability to provide care is dependent upon donations.  To support our mission, a surrender fee of $25 per animal will be collected.

ADMISSIONS CATEGORIES: 

It is not the Enid SPCA’s intent to provide a sanctuary for an animal’s lifetime residence.  To ensure that this does not happen, each animal undergoes an intake evaluation to determine (1) its general adoptability and (2) its suitability for admission into our shelter. Our Animal Intake Evaluation takes into consideration the following factors as defined by the Asilomar Accords, animals are grouped into three categories:

Healthy: The term “healthy” means and includes all cats and dogs 8 weeks of age or older that, at the time the animal is taken into possession, have manifested no sign of a behavioral characteristic that could pose a health or safety risk or otherwise make the animal unsuitable for placement as a pet and have shown no sign of a medical condition that would adversely affect its health. These animals are good candidates for adoption.

Treatable: The term “treatable” means and includes all cats and dogs that are “rehabilitatable” and all cats and dogs with conditions that are “manageable.”

Rehabilitatable: The term “rehabilitatable” means and includes all cats and dogs that are not “healthy,” but that are likely to become “healthy,” if given medical, foster, behavioral or other care. With this care, these animals may be candidates for adoption.

Manageable: The term “manageable” means and includes all cats and dogs that are not “healthy” and that are not likely to become “healthy,” regardless of the care provided, but would likely maintain a satisfactory quality of life if given medical, foster, behavioral or other care, including long-term care. With such care, these animals may be candidates for adoption.

Unhealthy and Untreatable: The term “unhealthy and untreatable” means and includes all dogs and cats who, at or subsequent to the time they are taken into possession,

  1. have a behavioral or temperamental characteristic that poses a health or safety risk or otherwise makes the animal unsuitable for placement as a pet, and are not likely to become “healthy” or “treatable” even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet guardians in the community; or
  2. are suffering from a disease, injury, or congenital or hereditary condition that adversely affects the animal’s health or is likely to adversely affect the animal’s health in the future, and are not likely to become “healthy” or “treatable” even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet guardians in the community; or
  3. are under the age of eight weeks and are not likely to become “healthy” or “treatable,” even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable an caring pet guardians in the community.

BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT : 

For behavioral assessment, the BARC – Behavior Assessment Reactivity Checklist from Bound Angles is used.   It’s an assessment tool designed to fairly evaluate a dog’s behaviors through a series of interactions.  The B.A.R.C. Checklist  is a simple checklist that anyone can complete.

Countless shelter dogs are killed each year because of faulty temperament tests.  These tests often falsely label dogs as aggressive or dangerous and destroy them because of the outcome of these “tests.”  These tests employ poking and prodding dogs with plastic hands, stressing dogs to failure and placing dogs into situations that cause them to fail.

B.A.R.C. uses a simple checklist which allows a person to fairly interact with a dog in a normal manner and document the results.  These results clearly show a dogs strong and weak points and are easy to understand by anyone reviewing the checklist.  This checklist can become part of the dog’s file and may be shown to prospective adopters or rescues.

Giving clear snapshots of a dog’s behaviors and reactions will increase the likelihood that the dog will end up in a suitable home.

B.A.R.C. contains tools to guide the evaluator to a clear interaction with the dog and gives him or her a better understanding of the dog’s core issues.  Unlike traditional temperament tests, B.A.R.C. does not pass or fail a dog depending on their issue(s).  The scenarios contained in B.A.R.C. are real life and fair to the dog.

Every dog deserves a fair chance at a happy home and every home deserves a fair chance at a stable dog.  B.A.R.C. changes the scenario for shelter dogs and levels the playing field for everyone.  This guide clearly explains the process and its components in an easy to understand format.  It is important that the person performing the checklist and evaluation has an opportunity to read and understand the guide before performing the assessment.

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